Ecological Balance has embarked on the potting of 5000 mahogany trees, as part of the close to 30 tree species ear-marked for her 2500 capacity tree nursery in Buea. This nursery is expected to provide good quality planting material for the Organization’s 2021 rewilding endeavours.

Commonly known as big leave Mahogany, Entandropragma angolensis is one of the giants of tropical rainforest with broad leaves especially suitable for water catchment protection. Classified as endangered on the IUCN Red List, this iconic species is highly cherished locally as the back is used in the treatment of stomach ache and fever. It is one of the top 10 timber species foraged from the Congo Basin Forests and widely used in the furniture, plywood and fishing boat manufacturing industries amongst others.

Managed by a team of trained botanists from Ecological Balance, in the days ahead the mahogany seedlings from this nursery will be transplanted into water catchments within the Buea Municipality. This as a way of curbing the long-standing water crisis that the town has been plunged in over the years. The trees will be planted by the miyawaki method that is known to recharge, purify and conserve ground water 30times faster. Some of the trees will be planted at the Bakingili Community Forest to mitigate deforestation and revamp the wildlife haven.

Established in June 2020 following difficulties faced by the Eco Balance team in getting planting material during the first 2miyawaki forests, plans are underway to expand the nursery to 100,000 saplings of at least 50species found in the Congo Basin Forest, according to the Executive Director, Limbi Blessing.

Meanwhile, trees planted at Bulu Water Catchment, using to Miyawaki method, to clean, recharge and conserve the underground water by the Ecological Balance team in collaboration with the community is already serving as anchor  to many biodiversity species, one year after. With support from SUGI, Ecological Balance planted some 3000  trees at the lone water source in  Bulu, a small village in Buea subdivision, South West Region, following the Miyawaki method known to recharge ground water thirty times faster; tree growth thirty times faster, as well as purify water amongst others. Recent statistics from Ecological Balance’s Field Manager, Njiafu Benardin, shows that 90% of the trees have survived and are serving as habitat for biodiversity species like crab, butter fly, birds, bees, frogs, caterpillars, millipede, insects, beetles and others.

Community members are anticipating how the 20 different trees species including Prunus africana, Mahogani, Dacryodes macrophyla, drum stick, avocado, jack fruit, mango, erythrina, Jatropha curcas, leuceana, acacia, Voacanga angolense, richinis comunis, plums, guava, umbrella tree, apple, bauhinia and Pachira aquatic has and will help them and the environment. .  “Since the planting of these trees, we have noticed that, the water catchment is always clean,”Mafani John, Chief of Bulu village said.

Though geared towards increasing the recharge of water at the Bulu Water Catchment serving as the lone source of drinking water to the Bulu community and other neighbouring villages, the planting of these trees was equally motivated by the need to contribute to global afforestation efforts and the mitigation of climate change.

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